Your goals, your success

IBA_web2_croppedThe IBA in Liberal Studies serves as a foundation for students’ specific interest for professional development, making a career change, or preparing for future studies.

Your degree, your life

The IBA program offers working adults the flexibility to individualize a program focus by combining interdisciplinary requirements and electives. A strong relationship with the faculty advisor makes this possible.

A bachelor’s degree that you can make your own.

The Individualized Bachelor of Arts major in Liberal Studies is designed for students who have specific academic goals in mind and want to develop their own degree program.

Here’s how it looks:

All IBA students will complete all 7 of our General Education courses plus a senior project (24 credits):

  • GNED 3210 Experience and Expression

  • GNED 3250 Modes & Methods of Learning

  • GNED 3310 Literary Analysis & Argumentation

  • GNED 3350 Culture, Conflict, and Social Research

  • GNED 3450 Foundations of Civilization

  • GNED 3510 Ecology, Technology, and Society

  • GNED 3550 Leadership

  • PRO 4970 Senior Project

The IBA concentration will contain 7 focus areas; students must choose one.  A focus area is a series of related courses within a concentration. There are 7 focus areas that will contain foundation courses, and that will introduce students to their respective fields of study:

Creative Writing: 5 focus area foundation courses (15 credits):

  • COM 3570 Short Story Writing

  • COM 3580 Playwriting & Performance

  • COM 3700 Professional Writing

  • COM 4320 Social Media & Social Change

  • COM 4700 Antioch Writers Workshop Seminar

Health and Wellness:  5 focus area foundation courses (15 credits):

  • HWL4000 Economics, Politics, & Access in Healthcare

  • HWL4010 Integration of Healthcare Modalities

  • HWL4020 History of Healthcare & Medical Ethics

  • HWL4040 Gender & Multicultural Issues in Healthcare

  • HWL4060 Health Behaviors & Society

Human Services Administration: 5 focus area foundation courses (15 credits):

  • HDV 4020 Child & Adolescent Development

  • HDV 4030 Adult Development

  • HSA 4200 Human Services Systems & Grants

  • MGT 3680 Accounting and Budgeting

  • MGT 3900 Human Resource Management

Humanities: 3 focus area foundation courses (18 credits):

  • HUM 3011 Ancient Civilizations: Africa to Asia

  • HUM 3021 Greek & Roman Civilization

  • HUM 3031 Jewish, Christian & Islamic Heritage

Literature: 5 focus area foundation courses (15 credits):

  • LIT 3630 Mixed Race Women’s Memoirs

  • LIT 4220 African American Women Writers

  • LIT 4520 American Literature

  • LIT 4620 English Literature

  • LIT 4650 Shakespeare

Management:  5 focus area foundation courses (15 credits):

  • MGT 3680 Accounting & Budgeting

  • MGT 3720 Business Law

  • MGT 4410 Economics – Micro and Macro

  • MGT 4780 Strategic Marketing

  • MGT 4840 Ethical Issues in Management

Sustainability: Choose 5 of any courses from the following list (15 credits):

  • PHIL 4120 Environmental Ethics

  • PLS 4250 Energy & US Environmental Policy

  • SCI 3150 Environmental Science

  • SCI 3250 Physical Science

  • SCI 3350 Biological / Ecological Systems

  • SOS 4200 Environmental Economics

  • SOS 4220 Environmental Health

  • SST 3500 Thinking in Systems

  • SST 3600 Population & Global Poverty

  • SST 3700 Culture & Ecology

  • SST 4100 Housing & Energy

  • SST 4200 Transportation & Energy

  • SST 4300 Conservation

  • SST 4400 Resource Scarcity & Conflict Management

  • SST 4500 Green Entrepreneurship

  • SST 4600 Sustainable Agriculture

Finally IBA students will complete 5 independent studies, or take 5 courses in other focus areas in consultation with their advisor, except those who do the Humanities focus area foundations courses (these students will do 4 individualized courses).

 

General Education

GNED-3210 Experience and Expression

Students discover the uniqueness of each human life by reading, comparing and comparing life stories about transformative experiences. They learn to write in their own voice from their own life experience employing rhetorical modes such as narration, description, example, comparison and contrast, process analysis, classification, cause and effect, and argument and persuasion. Students develop a new view of the world, of themselves, and of their interconnectedness to others.

GNED-3250 Modes & Methods of Learning

This course shows ways to identify and apply diverse modes of learning to achieve ends such as acquiring knowledge of self and world, solving problems, producing works of art, or engaging in public speaking. Students learn to distinguish facts from values, intuition from logic, imagination from objective representation, beliefs from arguments, synthesis from analysis, and qualitative from quantitative reasoning. They practice self-awareness and employ evidence and logic as foundations of inquiry.

GNED-3310 Literary Analysis & Argument

Students travel the world in literature to explore ideas, passions, and the lives of people in other times and places.Discussions focus on viewpoints and aims of characters, narrative techniques, cultural contexts, and intentionality in reading and writing. Students refine their ability to read closely and critically and to analyze literary texts using a variety of academic approaches. They learn both how to construct analytical arguments about literary themes and how this skill can be transferred to other professional situations. Prerequisite: GNED-3210.

GNED-3350 Culture, Conflict & Social Research

Introduces students to the historic and cultural origins of contemporary conflicts and the attitudes and institutions that perpetuate them. They learn methods of research that can effectively address the issues and questions that arise in conflict situations. Students learn how to pose productive questions, formulate hypotheses, design logical and effective research strategies, address issues of reliability and validity, and observe ethical protocols. They each conduct and compose a modest research project and make an oral presentation according to professional standards. Prerequisite: GNED-3250.

GNED-3450 Foundations of Civilization

This course focuses on understanding differences between cultures and civilizations, including how both evolve from specific environmental conditions, and are shaped to address local challenges. This course examines the religious, economic, and political systems in such foundational zones as ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, India and China, and Greece and Rome.

GNED-3510 Ecology, Technology & Society

This course explores the interdependency of natural and social systems, the factors that contribute to the evolution and disappearance of species, and the human impact on natural environments by factors such as overpopulation, pollution, war, and excess consumption. It also examines more sustainable initiatives in waste management, and agricultural production, the use of alternative energies and technologies, and policy efforts to both conserve natural resources and ecosystems and build more sustainable communities.

GNED-3550 Leadership

 The course explores the concept of Leadership as science, as art, and as service. In the process of studying cases of successful and failed leadership the course requires students to reflect on how to make their lives meaningful and productive through the cultivation and exercise of leadership skills. They learn how to employ creative means to achieve constructive ends and how, in the process, to serve with integrity as they draw upon the capacities of diverse human resources and deploy the skills of community building.

Creative Writing

COM 3570 Short Story Writing

Through this course, students will gain appreciation for the short story form through writing their own stories as well as through analyzing short story literature. Students will be expected to create a well-crafted short story by doing multiple drafts, which will provide experience in developing story ideas, characters, plot, setting, theme and dialogue as well as in story writing techniques such as pace, voice, tension, and description that can be applied to creating fiction of any length.

COM 3580 Playwriting & Performance

Students will develop their understanding of the basic principles of play construction and acting. They will do so by acting out monologues and dialogues written by published playwrights, and by acting out their own written materials. By the end of the course, the class should have written and performed at least one play for an invited audience.

COM 3700 Professional Writing

This course will help prepare students for writing as a profession. Students will do hands-on editing work, and will work with publishers and academics to refine their writings.

COM 4320 Social Media & Social Change

Students will hone their abilities to interface with the public through such media as Twitter, Facebook, blogging, and other social media, as well as through audio-visual 19 media. In addition, students will develop their ability to use conventional public media outlets, such as local newspapers, television stations, and radio stations. This course will differ from traditional media courses in that students will develop these social media skills in relation to vital social issues within a social justice framework, with the goal of changing the world.

COM 4700 Antioch Writers Workshop Seminar

 Students will develop and hone their craft through participation in the Antioch Writers’ Workshop summer program. Students focus their work in one of the following genres: poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction or memoir. After the AWW workshop, students refine their writing based on feedback from faculty and peers.

Health and Wellness:

HWL4000 Economics, Politics, & Access in Healthcare

This course investigates the tripartite relationship between Medicine, Government and Business. Topics for investigation include the privatization of health care delivery, HMOs and government regulation of health care financing and delivery, employer and employee funded health care, publicly funded health care initiatives such as Medicare, Medicaid, and indigent care, and the political economy of nationalized health care system.

HWL4010 Integration of Healthcare Modalities

This course introduces students to emerging methods of holistic medicine, and combinations of health and wellness practices. This course will investigate ways in which ‘alternative’ treatments and natural therapies such as massage therapy, yoga, reflexology, meditation, homeopathic medicines, herbal remedies, etc. can work in conjunction with, or in place of, traditional Western medical treatments. This course also includes ways of rethinking health care professions and relationships between various treatment providers and treatment recipients.

HWL4020 History of Healthcare & Medical Ethics

This course introduces students to healing practices that have endured from ancient to modern times in both the Eastern and Western traditions. The course surveys ancient beginnings of institutionalized medical practice, important historical divisions of medicine and resulting models of ethical reasoning in response to moral dilemmas in medical practices today. It involves such topics as: patient rights, end of life decisions, uses of genetic screening and the availability and distribution of health services.

HWL4040 Gender & Multicultural Issues in Healthcare

This course will examine ways in which gender and culture affect healthcare and approaches to medicine. In particular we will explore gender role expectations, the rise of the “women’s health” movement, ethnomedicine, and the psychology of health. The course also explores various ways in which individuals, households, larger groups of people and various medical systems and practitioners attempt to define, interpret and create health, as well as problems that arise from perceptions of difference.

HWL4060 Health Behaviors & Society

This course is designed to familiarize students with lifestyle choices that affect health and wellness, the way those choices affect others in society, and the way that institutions and governments work to influence those choices. The course will look at health behaviors such as smoking, alcohol use, drug use, obesity, sexual activity, recreational practices, and others, and at programs designed to promote healthy choices.

Human Services Administration:

HDV 4020 Child & Adolescent Development

This course examines the major theories and research findings in human development from conception and infancy through adolescence with an emphasis on physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development. The impact of contextual variables on the developmental process will be an ongoing focus of discussion.

HDV 4030 Adult Development

This course covers the development of the individual from young adulthood through old age in the context of contemporary society. Physical, psychological, and social changes are examined as they relate to individual and family functioning.

HSA 4200 Human Services Systems & Grants

This course explores the broad range of human services available in most large communities and the social policy context in which these services are delivered and funded. Topics include the ways in which services are delivered, the interconnections among the various agencies and organizations providing services and how to access these services including the writing of grants. Students have the opportunity to investigate services that are of particular interest to them as well as develop a philanthropy project. In this course, the student develops skills useful in conducting library research on and writing about topics in human development and human services and writing about topics in these fields. It emphasizes the preparation of grant applications in human services settings.

MGT 3680 Accounting and Budgeting

This course introduces the students to fundamental principles underlying the accounting function as it relates to the management of organizations. Students develop an accounting model, starting with simple concepts, and build toward a system overview by taking a practical approach to the subject. This course also examines the basic concepts and issues underlying budget planning as well as the relationships of budgeting, planning, accounting, and information systems to organizational goals, program objectives, and performance measures.

MGT 3900 Human Resource Management

This course introduces students to a critical examination of theoretical and practical issues of human resource management and strengthens their decision-making skills in personnel cases. It is designed to benefit all students of management.

Humanities:

HUM 3011 Ancient Civilizations: Africa to Asia

An exploration of the daily lives of people of antiquity, their worldviews and methods of social and political organization, their discoveries, inventions and creations in literature, science, and spiritual practice, and ways in which we can derive inspiration from their cultures and histories.

HUM 3021 Greek & Roman Civilization

This course explores the historical and cultural evolution of classical Greece and Rome through the epics, dramas, histories and philosophies that both reflected and shaped the minds and events from the Classical world. Students consider how reason and observation came to challenge Greek mythological thinking and how the Roman Empire rose to dominance throughout the Mediterranean world. The golden age of Greece is compared with the achievement of the Romans and students learn of the influence of both on the founding fathers and philosophies of the American Republic.

HUM 3031 Jewish, Christian & Islamic Heritage

In addition to learning about the main themes of the sacred scriptures, students explore the 25 diverse ways scholars have interpreted the Hebrew Scriptures, the New Testament, and the Qurâan. They explore how Judaism and Christianity took institutional shape and diversified over time. They view the Islamic world from the inside, examine its contributions to European civilization during the early Renaissance, and assess contemporary tensions and prejudices between the Muslim peoples and the West.

Literature:

LIT 3630 Mixed Race Women's Memoirs

LIT-3630 Mixed Race Women’s Memoirs This course is designed as a multidisciplinary exploration of race, gender and identity utilizing oral and written narratives of Blackwhite mixed race women from the mid-nineteenth century to the present as source material. Drawing from elements of cultural studies, African American studies, American studies and women’s studies, students will construct critical and historical contexts for self-identity and perceptions of that identity in women of interracial descent.

LIT 4220 African American Women Writers

This course is designed as a multidisciplinary exploration of race, gender and identity utilizing five significant novels written by African American women as source material.  Drawing from elements of literary theory, film/media studies, Africana studies, and women’s studies, students will construct critical and historical contexts for the impact of Black women’s cultural production on self-identity and external perceptions of that identity through the lens of Black feminism/womanism.

LIT 4520 American Literature

The literature in this course spans both the history of the U.S. and the cultural diversity of writers, both male & female. Within this broad frame, students read works which embody characteristic American themes such as conflicts over race, the struggle for equality, the pursuit of individual freedom, the questions of truth and destiny, the role of religious belief in a secular world, and the emergence of a multi-ethnic society. Students will discuss the distinctiveness of American contributions to world literature.

LIT 4620 English Literature

This course surveys the literature of the British Isles from the late eighteenth century to the modern day. It explores trends such as Romanticism, Imagism and Formalism, while addressing such themes as individual freedom, alienation, industrialism, the changing role of the family, and the impact of Imperialism. This course includes the study of poetry, short stories, short novels, and essays from a representative sample of important modern British authors.

LIT 4650 Shakespeare

This course will examine Shakespeare’s major writings, including his important plays and sonnets. It will also include some biographical information, including some of his personal correspondences, so that students gain insight into the relationship between his personal life and his authorship. Besides reading Shakespeare’s works, students will also engage in critical research on his writings.

Management:

MGT 3680 Accounting & Budgeting

MGT-3680 Accounting and Budgeting  This course introduces the students to fundamental principles underlying the accounting function as it relates to the management of organizations. Students develop an accounting model, starting with simple concepts, and build toward a system overview by taking a practical approach to the subject. This course also examines the basic concepts and issues underlying budget planning as well as the relationships of budgeting, planning, accounting, and information systems to organizational goals, program objectives, and performance measures.

MGT 3720 Business Law

This is a comprehensive survey of the courts and laws affecting business, with particular emphasis on torts, contracts, agency, partnerships, corporations, Uniform Commercial Code, antitrust, employment, real and personal property, insurance, wills, and trusts.

MGT 4410 Economics - Micro and Macro

This course provides an understanding of methods, theories and concepts of microeconomic analysis and their application to basic management decisions pertaining to production, marketing, finance, and investment. Emphasis is placed on theoretical and practical rationales underlying economic decisions. This course also studies the aggregate economy focusing on the major macroeconomic problems of income, employment and prices. Major theories of macroeconomic instability are presented along with resulting policy options. International economics, international finance and economic growth are also studied.

MGT 4780 Strategic Marketing

This course examines marketing as the business function that identifies current unfulfilled needs and wants, defines and measures their magnitude, determines what target markets the organization can best serve, and decides on appropriate products, services, and programs to serve these markets.

MGT 4840 Ethical Issues in Management

This course provides an ethical investigation of the context of American business, including capitalism and the free market system. This includes an inquiry into the ethical nature and role of business organizations within this broad economic context, as well as an examination of particular ethical issues, which arise in the course of this activity.

Sustainability:

PHIL 4120 Environmental Ethics

Students are introduced to how philosophical assumptions and worldviews permeate our orientations to the natural world. We also examines our duties to preserve natural resources, conserve biodiversity, and expanour conceptions of rights to include those of future generations, other species, and terrestrial and aquatic habitats.

PLS 4250 Energy & US Environmental Policy

This course will examine the history of environmental policies, regulations and regulatory bodies in the United States. It will focus on the relationship between environmental decision-making, risk assessment, and natural resource policy in relation to energy use,development and security.

SCI 3150 Environmental Science

This course is designed to introduce students to emerging trends in the natural sciences concerning the environment. Several issues will be addressed, including: biomes; biological communities; species interactions; biodiversity; environmental health and toxicology; land use; water, air and solid waste; energy conservation; climate; natural preservation; resource depletion and management; human population growth; food; urbanization; scarcity; and sustainability.

SCI 3250 Physical Science

Physical Science is an introductory course that theoretically explores the areas of forces, energy, kinetic theory, work, simple machines, electricity and magnetism, wave theory (light and sound), geology, astronomy and meteorology. Theory, application and technology will be addressed. Various teaching / learning strategies will be explored and used throughout the class.

SCI 3350 Biological/Ecological Systems

This course examines the biodiversity of the planet, including the structure and functioning of diverse organisms and their co-evolution with the environment.

SOS 4200 Environmental Economics

This course focuses on understanding macroeconomic theories and the reliance that market mechanisms have historically had on cheap resource availability and cheap energy. The course additionally addresses our understanding of the health and ecological benefits that diverse ecosystems provide, and for finding ways to internalize these values inside of market mechanisms.

SOS 4220 Environmental Health

This course focuses on understanding public health in relation to environmental factors such as air pollution, water pollution, and solid and hazardous waste disposal. It also addresses public health concerns raised by risks due to food supplies in a global marketplace, the spread of infectious diseases, and the apparatuses necessary to deliver health care services to poor and under-serviced populations.

SST 3500 Thinking in Systems

This course introduces students to how organic and natural systems function, how such systems are structured, and how their structure is related to their behavior. It introduces students to how systems maintain steady flows of inputs and outputs, and how various factors can destabilize the dynamics of a system. It also introduces students to ways in which feedback loops inside of systems can provide ways of understanding how and when to intervene to regain the structural integrity of dynamic systems.

SST 3600 Population & Global Poverty

This course will focus on factors that have led to the alarming rate of growth in the world’s population. It will focus on the demographics of population growth and disparities in wealth distribution. It will also examine methods of curbing global population growth, some of which use laws and public policies, some of which use market mechanisms, and some of which use the development and health and educational networks.

SST 3700 Culture & Ecology

This course introduces students to a variety of cultures from around the world, and focuses on how each developed in relation to its natural environment. The course also examines historical and economic changes that have resulted from environmental changes, population and demographic shifts, and interactions between cultural groups.

SST 4100 Housing & Energy

This course analyzes the relationship between housing and energy consumption, with an emphasis on understanding how to design energy- efficient housing, and how to retrofit existing housing in affordable ways. This course will include a minimum of 15 hours of field-based learning.

SST 4200 Transportation & Energy

This course analyzes urban transportation, mass transit, and public and private investment in transportation networks both inside the United States and globally. The emphasis will be on developing community-based transportation networks that are less dependent on fossil fuels. This course will include a minimum of 15 hours of field-based learning.

SST 4300 Conservation

This course examines methods for preserving and protecting endangered plant and animal species and habitats by focusing on the critical factors that affect the survival of species in various biomes. We will look at important areas demanding public protection, including marine habitats, wetlands, prairies and forests. This course will include a minimum of 15 hours of field-based learning.

SST 4400 Resource Scarcity & Conflict Management

This course addresses the problems that result from growing demand for scarce natural resources including water, petroleum, coal and natural gas, brought about by increasing consumption, population growth, and dwindling supplies of fossil fuels. The course will also examine models of understanding how conflicts over scarce resources develop, and how we can begin to analyze and manage such conflicts. This course will include a minimum of 15 hours of field-based learning.

SST 4500 Green Entrepreneurship

This course covers the process of bringing new innovations and ideas to fruition. By emphasizing where sources of funding (grants, governmental programs and incentives, universities and school systems, philanthropic organizations) can be combined with markets and organizations to take ideas from the research and development phases to being market-ready, this course combines theoretical approaches to market innovation with hands-on experience and practice. This course will include a minimum of 15 hours of field-based learning.

SST 4600 Sustainable Agriculture

This course begins by addressing changes in agriculture brought about during the Green Revolution, when farming methods became intricately linked to fossil fuel-based energy and petrochemical soil management. It will look at problems that have arisen such as soil erosion and water pollution. It will emphasize less energy-intensive soil management principles and alternative forms of agriculture including permaculture, agroforestry, and organic farming. It will also emphasize agriculture methods that can be applied in multiple climates. This course will include a minimum of 15 hours of field-based learning.

Sample IBA Program

Liberal Studies major with a concentration in Individualized Studies (aka IBA) with a focus in Health and Wellness:

General Education Courses (24 credits):

  • GNED 3210 Experience and Expression

  • GNED 3250 Modes & Methods of Learning

  • GNED 3310 Literary Analysis & Argumentation

  • GNED 3350 Culture, Conflict, and Social Research

  • GNED 3450 Foundations of Civilization

  • GNED 3510 Ecology, Technology, and Society

  • GNED 3550 Leadership

  • PRO 4970 Senior Project

Focus Area Courses in Health and Wellness (15 credits):

  • HWL4000 Economics, Politics, & Access in Healthcare

  • HWL4010 Integration of Healthcare Modalities

  • HWL4020 History of Healthcare & Medical Ethics

  • HWL4040 Gender & Multicultural Issues in Healthcare

  • HWL4060 Health Behaviors & Society

Individualized Courses (15 credits) – Taken from other focus area courses, or from Independent Studies, with advisor approval.

Total: 54 credits

Balance of credits up to 120 semester credits to be accepted in transfer or taken at AUM as elective credit.